May 23, 2019

Prieur Leary

It is certainly the case that Prieur Leary has thus far enjoyed a long and very fruitful career in the information technology industry, otherwise known as the technology industry. In part because he is fluent in Spanish and also understands Portuguese, he has been able to gain a lot of experience and knowledge in the area of international business relations.

That said, however, Prieur Leary’s specialty, however, is in the area of information technology, which is actually a very diverse profession involving the use of computers to store information and data, or to retrieve, transmit and/or manipulate that data. The term “information technology” was coined in the middle of the last century, in order to differentiate between technology that served a single function, like a lathe, and computers, which can facilitate multiple functions and which can be used to compete myriad tasks in the function of any organization. IT can include computers and computer networks, of course, but these days, it can include smartphones, tablets, and software and apps designed to perform some very necessary functions. And all of it requires a high level of security, both outside and inside the organization.

May 23, 2019

Prieur Leary

From the perspective of Prieur Leary, perhaps because he does so much work in the financial services sector, any laxity in the security of any information technology (IT) system or network is completely untenable. That experience is dwarfed by his experience in the information technology (IT) sector, so his real expertise is in computer systems and keeping them secure. Prieur Leary knows the key to doing business online comes with realizing that many of the biggest threats to any IT system tend to be internal, meaning they are at least as common as external threats, if not moreso.

The term Information technology (IT) was coined in the mid-20th Century as a way to describe the use of any computers, storage, networking and other physical devices, infrastructure and processes to create, process, store, secure and exchange all forms of electronic data. The term was intended to make a distinction between purpose-built machines designed to perform a limited scope of functions and general-purpose computing machines that could be programmed and re-programmed for a wide variety of functions and tasks.